Heads Up: 20 to 50 Pound Catfish All Around

Rockfish are becoming more dependable everyday as the days shorten. 

Local Rockfish in the 20 to 30 inch size are gathered around structure and shorelines for lure casters and trollers in the early mornings, dusk, and high tides. Both the Patuxent and Potomac have active, feeding Rockfish. Trollers are also finding the Stripers in the deep holes and troughs in the rivers and in the ship's channel in the mid-bay. Breaking fish are eating bait fish on the surface in the mouth of the Patuxent from Hog Point to the Three-legged most anytime. The Green Holly area to the mouth of West Basin is a hot spot in the Patuxent.

The long awaited rain early this week will activate the fish. Spot are still here. Big spot are in Cornfield Harbor in 12 to 20 feet. Ragged Point has Big Spot and Perch aplenty. White Perch are now in the creeks on generous tides for lure casters and in the rivers in the 30 to 40 foot edges for bottom fishermen.

Undersized Redfish are in the creeks taking Beetle Spins. These fish will head for warmer climates when we get a cold snap, but there is mostly warmth in the forecast for the next ten days. There is plenty to eat, and crabs are still shedding so there is no reason for the fish to leave. Rockfish in the 13 to 15 inch size are in the creeks with the Redfish.

There are plenty of big Catfish in the upper regions of the Patuxent and Potomac and they are hungry. Fresh Alewives cut into big chunks and fished on the bottom around Morgantown in the Potomac and around the Benedict Bridge in the Patuxent will do the trick for the dinner table. There are 20 to 50 pound bruisers all around; you are forewarned.

Michael Procter with a typical 12 inch Gray Weakfish (Seatrout)
Johnnie Caldwell landed this 30 inch, 12 pound Tockfish at CedarPoint on a cast Yo-Zuri Silver Minnow crank bait
Patrick Scriber with a 4 pound Largemoth from a local farmpound
Michele Cheldnik with a pair of Stripers from Cedar Point